Friday, January 22, 2010

Latest Morgan Poll - 58..5%-41.5%

The latest face-to-face Morgan Poll conducted over two weekends, January 9/10 & 16/17, 2010 shows the ALP (58.5%, up 1.5%% since the last face-to-face poll conducted on December 19/20, 2009 & January 2/3, 2010) maintaining a strong two-party preferred lead over the L-NP (41.5%, down 1.5%).

The ALP primary vote rose 2% to 47.5%, and remains clearly ahead of the L-NP (35.5%, down 1.5%), while looking at the minor parties shows support for the Greens rising (10%, unchanged), Family First (2%, unchanged) and Independents/ Others (5.0%, down 0.5%).

The Roy Morgan Government Confidence Rating is now at 136.5 (up 4pts) with 59.5% (up 1%) of Australians confident that Australia is ‘heading in the right direction,’ compared to 23% (down 3%) that say Australia is ‘heading in the wrong direction.’

The weekly Roy Morgan Consumer Confidence Rating for January 16/17, 2010 is 130.0, up 1.1pts from the last Consumer Confidence rating conducted on January 9/10, 2010, and up 2.2pts over the period of interviewing for this poll.

Gary Morgan says:

“The Rudd Government (58.5%, up 1.5%) has strengthened its Two-Party preferred lead over the Tony Abbott-led Opposition (41.5%, down 1.5%) as Australians return to work after their Summer holidays.

“The increased lead for the ALP is matched by rising Consumer Confidence — now at 130.0 (already up 9.6pts in 2010) and at its highest for nearly five years, since February 2005 (132.0).

“Incumbent Governments usually gain support as Consumer Confidence rises, and today’s Morgan Poll shows the Rudd Government is also benefiting from an increasingly confident Australian population.”

Electors were asked: “If a Federal election for the House of Representatives were being held today — which party would receive your first preference?”

This face-to-face Morgan Poll on Federal voting intention was conducted on the weekends of January 9/10 & 16/17, 2010, with an Australia-wide cross-section of 1,819 electors. Of all electors surveyed, 4.5% (unchanged) did not name a party.

Business as usual, basically.
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